spotlight

Connie Sprauer

Spraer-Headshot-WPConnie Sprauer is senior vice president for legal affairs and general counsel for Exeter Health Resources, Inc., in Exeter, N.H. Her employer/client is an ‘integrated delivery system’ in the seacoast area of New Hampshire consisting of a full-service community hospital, a 150-provider multi-specialty group practice in 15 locations throughout the area, and a home care agency.

Connie has spent virtually her entire career directed towards the improvement of health care access and delivery. Prior to BC Law, she had developed and administered a number of comprehensive community-based and hospital-based health care facilities. Later, in practicing law, she represented hospitals, physicians, and other providers, assisting them to legally conduct their business in the heavily regulated and rapidly changing health care industry, and also taught college and graduate level courses in health law and medical ethics for health care administration students. In the last decade, Connie has come full circle from private practice back to the health care delivery environment, but with the additional knowledge base and skill sets gained from her legal training and practice. Connie says, “I am pleased that many of the values and innovative concepts I worked to promote during my career are now, or are becoming, mainstream.”

Connie was an active member of AirLifeLine, a nationwide organization of volunteer pilots who flew patients needing care to distant places. For years, Connie was a longtime board member, did their legal work, and was a volunteer pilot.

Connie was an active member of AirLifeLine, a nationwide organization of volunteer pilots who flew patients needing care to distant places. For years, Connie was a longtime board member, did their legal work, and was a volunteer pilot.

In her spare time, Connie enjoys piloting her plane. Connie’s avocation grew out of her time as a new lawyer. “While a junior associate doing long hours and some boring work, I was looking for fun and got my pilot’s license,” explains Connie. She bought a small airplane, which she still has, and uses it to visit distant family and friends, to conduct charitable flights, for short sightseeing hops and for vacations in the United States, the Bahamas, and eastern Canada. Being a private pilot can lead to adventures that are otherwise not very accessible, such as a memorable dog-sledding trip in a northern Ontario wilderness area. Connie recalls the “most fun” aviator experience was participating in an all-women, three-day, cross-country air race, f/k/a the “Powder Puff Derby.” There were 48 planes, each handicapped based on its own airspeeds, and each with two female co-pilots (the most experienced in her late 80s).

Connie describes her dog-sledding trip to northern Ontario: “Our trip was 25 miles out. We stayed overnight in a cabin with all 48 dogs clipped to a metal cable strung along the river outside, and then back the next day. During the overnight, eastern wolves came out of the woods on the other side of the river to check out our dog teams. The dogs woke us up with their howling, and the wolves just stared. We never would have guessed that 48 dogs could each have their own unique howling voice, but they did!”

Connie recalls, “Despite our landing first at the race terminus, our time placed us second to last in the race! We had added 22 minutes to our time when my co-pilot, who was navigating on that leg, got airsick from the North Carolina summer heat and wouldn’t or couldn’t focus out of the window to spot the next landing airport, which was on her side and partially hidden in a hazy mountain valley!”

Connie’s flying adventures have taken her to the back-country of Canada to enjoy dog-sled racing. Connie describes her dog-sledding trip to northern Ontario: “Our trip was 25 miles out. We stayed overnight in a cabin with all 48 dogs clipped to a metal cable strung along the river outside, and then back the next day. During the overnight, eastern wolves came out of the woods on the other side of the river to check out our dog teams. The dogs woke us up with their howling, and the wolves just stared. We never would have guessed that 48 dogs could each have their own unique howling voice, but they did!”

Connie is already registered for our reunion and looks forward to catching up with all of us there. Will she arrive by plane or sled? You will only know if you come too!

Return to Class of 1985 Newsletter >>